Investing Education Stories

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

If you have are unfamiliar with the candlestick pattern doji, I highly recommend to go and read what that candlestick pattern is as it will give you insight to what this pattern entails. As the title may suggest, a long legged doji is a doji that has long wicks, indicating that the trading range is wide but the open and close were essentially the same. Easily located on a chart, it can mean a few different things.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

A popular data point among traders and investors alike is the standard deviation, which allows the person to gauge where the market may go for a given period. With that, there is a data set called the semi deviation, and this helps with looking at the returns that are below the mean.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

There are several different types of momentum oscillators out there, and this is another one of them. Created by Tushar Chande, this measures momentum in the market you are analyzing. How this particular tool works is by taking the difference between the sum of all gains and sum of all losses, dividing that by the sum of all price movements. All these need to occur within the same period. This indicator is measured between positive one hundred and negative one hundred.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

If you have not done so or are new to exponential smoothing, check out simple exponential smoothing. It will give you a better understanding of double exponential smoothing and what the differences may be between the two. One of the main differences between the two is that simple exponential smoothing tends to lack when the market is trending.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

This particular data point on its own is minimal, as it is apart of a larger indicator called the Directional Movement Index or DMI for short. There are three different lines in the DMI and the minus direction movement is one of them that helps traders determine direction in the market. DMI is measured using a range of 0 to 100 and fluctuates as the market moves.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

There are a plethora of Oscillators on the market and one that is popular is the Ultimate Oscillator. This particular tool was created by Larry Williams in 1976 and the goal is to use multiple time frames in a way to eliminates what other tools may be missing. If you’ve noticed that many oscillators are quick to move and are not that smooth, which can bring mixed signals.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

There are many different valuation methodologies out there. Similar to target pricing, you can find and interpret numbers in many different ways. Certainly many numbers are hard facts, but others not so much. Price to sales ratio is used with evaluating potential stock investments. It is calculated by taking the market cap of the company and dividing it by the revenue.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

If this is your first exposure to Harami patterns, I highly recommend understanding the traditional Harami candlestick pattern. There are many types of patterns out there but this one may be easier to find because it utilizes only two candles. Patterns are not a certain indication of market trends, but rather an alert that there might be a shift in the market.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

Harami patterns are probably one of the more common patterns in the market. Identifying this pattern is simple as it involved two candles. Also making this easy is the pattern can occur in either a bullish or bearish market, allowing for flexibility. Patterns should be used as alerts because they are not one hundred percent accurate. Now, let us dive into the pattern.

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  over a year ago at Macroaxis 
By Nathan Young

Judging by the title, I’m sure you can guess that the three stars in the south candlestick pattern recognizes three candles. This particular pattern represents a bullish reversal, meaning the market should be in a downtrend when looking for this pattern. Patterns are not one hundred percent accurate but are a wonderful way to become alerted to potential shifts in the market.

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